Pec mobility drills… for everyone!

Shoulder problems?

With many injuries and restrictions I find the the pectoralis minor is often very tight and more importantly weak.

Whether this is the symptom, cause or just a secondary factor, mobilising this region is very useful.

This is a nice routine to work on the #mobility of this often tight and prohibited region.

Try:

– 10 reps arm @ 90 degrees palm up

– 10 reps @ 90 degrees palm down

– 10 reps @ 100, 110, etc Palm down depending on your restriction

– Finally you can lift the shoulder off the ground for 30 seconds to stretch out.

Test length / movement before and retest after. I like this pre and post-lifting, especially for any overhead movements #pullups #snatch #OHP # muscleups #physio #crossfit #rehab #WOD

 

New Canary Wharf clinic – CrossFit Thames!

Thanks!
Emerson

Physiotherapy @ CrossFit Thames

Sunday 13/08/17

 10-12 noon

 Emerson (XPhysio) is a sports Physiotherapist and CrossFitter. He works regularly with weightlifters, gymnasts, athletes and weekend warriors to assist them in staying healthy and reaching their training and competitive goals.

He will be running a FREE injury clinic on Sunday 13th August between 10-12 noon. These are 20 minute appointments for injury assessment and advice. So, if you are having any aches and pains that you are not sure about, new or are simply re-occurring, then pop in for a chat! The session will consist of a movement screen with emphasis on any specific injuries with advice.

I will then be holding regular weekly clinics at CrossFit Thames – WEDNESDAY PM!

You can book in by emailing:

emerson@xphysio.com

 For information about how to book in for Physio, please speak to Coach Phil!

Free injury advice clinic 14/05/16 @ CrossFit Hackney!

Injury clinic – Saturday 14/05/16

Hi all!

I’m running a free ‘niggles’ clinic on Saturday 14th May between 9-11am. They will be approx. 20 minutes injury assessment and advice sessions. So if you are having any aches and pains that you are not sure about, new or simply niggling then pop in for a chat!

crossfit-injuries-5

First come, first served so please contact me at emerson@xphysio.com or on 07903 247247 to book in. Open to all CrossFitters!

 

Momentum (CrossFit Hackney) |Arch 328 Stean Street | Hackney | E8 4ED

Thanks, Emerson (Physio)

Don’t miss out on our FREE marathon preparation evening!

Complimentary Marathon Preparation Evening with Complete Physio!
London_Marathon_Logo

Following the success of the last three years, Complete Physio is hosting its fourth annual Complimentary Marathon Preparation Evening to prepare both your body and mind for the grueling 26.2 miles.

Join Sports Physio, Chris Myers and the Complete Physio Team for an evening of marathon preparation. The evening will be packed with insight, experience and education which will aid novice runners through to regular marathon competitors.

The topics being discussed are:

  • Injury prevention with physiotherapist Chris Myers
  • Marathon training plans with personal trainer Ben Leach
  • Optimum nutrition with sports dietitian Rick Miller
  • How to train your brain for success and how to use mental rehearsals to improve performance with hypnotherapist Phil Dobson

The event is totally free and will be held on Wednesday 28th January 2015 at 6:30 p.m. on the 30th Floor of the CityPoint building.

Please click the EventBrite link to find more information and to RSVP, and we look forward to seeing you on the 28th!

http://www.eventbrite.com/e/complimentary-marathon-preparation-evening-tickets-15274201548?ref=ebtn
Best of luck with your marathon training!

Emerson

Marathon

MANAGEMENT OF TENDINOPATHIES WITH ULTRASOUND TISSUE CHARACTERISATION (UTC)

Just received a really nice little article written by Jarrod Antflick and good friend and colleague Chris Myers!

They have been working with UTC and tendinopathies over the last eighteen months or so and have some really good data and thoughts on rehab now.

You can download the article for FREE at: https://zl199.infusionsoft.com/app/page/1eca04acb357e34b1aed433ba63cd590

achilles

 

This newer imaging technique should really make you think about the way you load tendinopathies from now on…

Looking at rehab specifically, the authors highlight a few key points:

Consider the irritability of the tendon when designing a loading programme. 3 x 15 reps eccentric loading is not always the solution!

Consider adding in moderate and heavy isometric exercises.

Don’t forget Soleus strengthening!

Be cautious loading into end-of-range with irritable tendon  or if you suspect the plantaris involvement.

Make sure you download a copy for the full read!

For more info and to book in for UTC, you can contact Chris directly: chris@complete-physio.co.uk

Cheers guys!

Emerson

Rolling, rolling, rolling… why are we foam rolling?

Keep rolling, rolling, rolling…

They are in every box, gym, yoga studio, and sports club in all shapes and sizes, textures and densities! I get a lot of questions about foam rollers!

How often? How hard? How long? Before or after exercise? Which muscles?

Chris Beardsley, a well-known sports science writer, wrote an informative article in 2013 looking at some of the evidence around foam rolling: http://www.strengthandconditioningresearch.com/2013/10/01/foam-rolling/

The article is well worth a read! It got me thinking so here is my take on things…

What tissues are we actually affecting?

Fascia – mainly. Fascia is an uninterrupted viscoelastic tissue, which forms a functional 3-dimensional collagen matrix. Basically, fascia surrounds and penetrates every structure in the body, head to toe. It is an innervated, continuous, functional organ of stability and motion. And it is tough!

What is foam rolling?

Foam rolling is a form of self-myofascial release. What is myofascial release? That is another well-debated subject! It has been suggested that applying pressures to tissues can:

1) Rehydrate tissues

2) Reduce pain (a neural response?)

3) Improve vascular function

4) Release trigger points and break up adhesions

5) Reduce the effects of DOMS (Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

6) Improve tissue range of motion (ROM).

What is the evidence?

There is limited, good quality evidence; however, Chris Beardsley has summarised the findings so far:

1. Foam rolling may reduce arterial stiffness, improve arterial function and improve vascular endothelial function – therefore potentially increase blood flow.

2. Foam rolling may have no detrimental effects on athletic performance pre-workout – therefore no effect.

3. Foam rolling may increase joint ROM while not impeding the production of muscular force or rate of force development – pre workout mobility could increase range. It is at least as effective as static stretching however does not reduce performance which static stretching has been shown to do (http://journals.lww.com/nsca-jscr/Abstract/publishahead/Differential_effects_of_30_s_vs__60_s_static.97324.aspx)

4. Foam rolling does not acutely affect counter-movement, squat or depth jump performance. A dynamic warm-up is better.

5. There is mixed evidence on whether foam rolling increases flexibility long term.

6. Foam rolling reduces muscle soreness. A more recent study concluded that the reduced feeling of fatigue may allow participants to extend acute workout time and volume, which can lead to chronic performance enhancements (http://journals.lww.com/nsca-jscr/Abstract/2014/01000/The_Effects_of_Myofascial_Release_With_Foam.8.aspx).

When should you foam roll?

 

Based on the evidence and also clinical experience these are the recommendations:

 

–       Foam roll myofascial structures to increase joint ROM pre-workout. Be specific – work on the areas that you have problems with and be specific to the exercise you are about to perform. Don’t replace a dynamic warm-up – supplement it.

 

–       Use foam rolling post-workout for quicker short-term recovery.

 

–       Regular use may help longer-term recovery and sustained performance.

 

–       Make it functional – get into end of range or dynamic positions to mimic what you are going to exercise.

 

–       It doesn’t work for everything – use other tools and types of mobility drills too!

 

How should I foam roll?

 

I work on trigger points. These have been well mapped out by Travell and Simon’s (http://www.triggerpoints.net/). Find a ‘tender’ or ‘tight’ spot, and then apply pressure with the roller for up to 20 seconds. IF it has started to ease, stay on it for another ten seconds then release. 30 seconds maximum – you don’t want an ischemic response, which will just be painful and may actually start to damage the tissue. Try to work through a few specific trigger points along the structure you are working on. Spend 60-90 seconds rolling out the area, then move on! This shouldn’t take you more than five minutes to be effective – even when looking at a large area like the lateral thigh / Illiotibial band (ITB).

Vastus_Lasterallis

I also really like it for thoracic extension – more of a joint mobilisation. Great pre-Olympic lifting and for any overhead movements where extension is key:

Other resources:

 

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnnB4zDBqZHhQ4uLTAX8eYA

http://catalysttrainingsystems.ca/2013/11/youre-not-stretching-what-you-think-youre-stretching-part-i/

http://catalysttrainingsystems.ca/2013/11/fascia-part-2/

 

Not a bad video demonstrating basic positions for foam rolling:

 

So there you have it! As always, if you have any questions please feel free to grab me or contact me!

 

Emerson

07903247247

emerson@xphysio.com

 XPhysio.com_taglogo

Do you need a MARATHON MOT?

January is nearly up and it seems like everyone is up and running… literally!

So if you have already entered or considering a distance event this year then prevention is better than cure!
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To discuss or to make a booking with us at Angel, Shoreditch or Dalston clinics please contact:

emerson@xphysio / 07903247247